Railcars & Multiple Units

Following the railcars Heljan have announced single car and 3-car DMU sets
Heljan Class 128 Single Car Parcels BR Blue with Full Yellow Ends M55995 O Gauge 8950
£295.00
MRP £579.00
Warehouse: 1
Fast delivery from Warehouse.
(Product Ref 100014)
GWR AEC Railcar GWR Chocolate & Cream with white roof and Monogram
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105978)
GWR AEC Railcar GWR Chocolate & Cream with dark grey roof and GWR Coat of Arms
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105979)
GWR AEC Railcar BR Crimson & Cream with Dark Grey Roof
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105980)
GWR AEC Railcar BR Crimson & Cream with White Cab Roofs
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105981)
GWR AEC Railcar BR Green with Speed Whiskers and White Cab Roofs
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105982)
GWR AEC Railcar BR Green with Speed Whiskers and Grey Roof
Price to be Advised
These are proposed Liveries
£466.65
MRP £549.00

Will be ordered - delivery as soon as possible.
(Product Ref 105983)
Have a question? Contact us

Britains' railways experimented with diesel traction through the early part of the 20th century, trying out a number of single car railbus type units. The GWR put the first successful railcars into service in the 1930s, combining AEC bus diesel engines and streamlined bodywork by Park Royal with railway coach structural engineering to create stylish express railcars. Drive was arranged through a mechanical transmission via cardan shafts and axle-end gearboxes. The GWR assembled a fleet of 38 of these railcars with units designed for branch line, suburban, mainline stopping and express service. The last 4 Swindon-built railcars were arranged as single ended multiple-unit cars,
British Railways greatly refined the GWRs multiple unit design in the 1950s. Though the base technology was very similar drive shafts ran under the frames to final drive gearboxes mounted centrally on the axles and more conventional railway passenger coach bodies were fitted. Two principal roles were defined, suburban passenger and cross country. Suburban units had doors to each seating bay to allow rapid loading and unloading. Cross-country units had more spacious saloon seating with door vestibules and were intended for longer distance and branch services.