CM Models CM430 Roma Ocean Liner Waterline Model 1/1250

£86.00
MRP £86.00
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(Product Ref 109415)
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Following the end of World War I, many shipping companies were waiting to have enough money to build new liners. Navigazione Generale Italiana ordered two new 30,000 gross tons transatlantic ocean liners to Ansaldo shipyard. The first ship was launched in 1926 and christened Roma. She had an entirely steel hull. Her interior was decorated in Baroque style. The ship was 32,583 GRT with signal code letters ICEV.[1] The Roma, unlike MS Augustus, her sister ship, which was powered by Diesel engines, was powered by eight turbines connected in couples to four shafts, and whose steam was provided by 9 double ended and 4 single ended boilers for a total of 13.[1] The ship was rated for a speed of 22 knots. The ship could house 1700 passengers (375 first, 300 second, 300 intermediate, 700 third class). Her two funnels were repainted into the Italian Line's colors after her company merged with Lloyd Sabaudo and Cosulich Line to form the new Italian Line. In 1933 the intermediate class was replaced by the touristic one. The main deck was covered with teak. On 30 January 1932, Roma rammed the American ocean liner President Roosevelt at New York, severely damaging President Roosevelt.[2] President Roosevelt was repaired and returned to service. Conversion to aircraft carrier[edit] Main article: Italian aircraft carrier Aquila When World War II broke out, she was laid up and later taken over by the Italian Navy. She was then refitted and transformed into an aircraft carrier named Aquila. Her speed was increased to 30 knots after the refitting. She was taken over by the German occupation forces in 1943 but was partially scuttled by Italian Co-belligerents two years later. After the end of the conflict, her wreckage was raised and towed to La Spezia, where she was scrapped in 1951–1952.
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